The brain uses the same pathways when we produce speech and predict sounds
12 July 2018

By comparing brain activity when individuals are making sounds, anticipating forthcoming sounds or listening to sounds passively, researchers have shown that the same pathways are involved.

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Redrawing the map of brain connections involved in extinguishing learned fear
22 May 2018

The identification of a new connection in the brain involved in reducing the fear response upends the current model of fear extinction.

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Polar expedition: mapping connections at the tip of the brain
15 May 2018

Humans are not the only primate species to have subdivisions in the frontopolar cortex.

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What’s that? How the brain makes sense of objects in surprising and unsurprising places
8 May 2018

Several areas of the brain involved in processing visual information respond differently depending on whether an object is in an expected or an unexpected location.

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From noise to meaning: how visual information makes sense
26 April 2018

Dr Elizabeth Zavitz, an Affiliate Postdoctoral Researcher based at Monash University, has created a digital exhibition that illustrates how different types of visual information combine to produce our perception experience.

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A part of the brain can still see – even if you can’t
26 April 2018

Even if the primary visual cortex is damaged — causing blindness — the pathway that transmits visual information from the retina is not completely destroyed. The penultimate stop on the pathway still processes visual information, even if it has nowhere to go.

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In-phase doesn’t help, anti-phase doesn’t hinder
12 April 2018

In-phase or anti-phase electrical stimulation of the brain’s hemispheres does not affect the ability to track objects moving between the left and right fields of vision.

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Your brain is full of spots, and somebody has counted all of them
28 March 2018

The distribution of highly active cells in the brain’s visual processing area reveals similarities between humans and other primates.

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Rhythmic brain waves determine what you see – or don’t see
27 March 2018

Rhythmic brain waves determine what you see – or don’t see.

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Seeing fast, acting slow
13 March 2018

Identifying an object in an unexpected location is quick, but responding to it is slowed down.

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Studying a syndrome caused by a DNA deletion could provide insights into how schizophrenia develops
1 March 2018

A syndrome that increases the risk of developing schizophrenia is also linked to increased sensitivity to repeated sounds.

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Greater flexibility in brain networks helps you solve harder puzzles
15 February 2018

The more different your brain networks are between resting and reasoning, the better your chances of solving difficult tasks.

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Brain stimulation reverses the effects of fast music on learning
8 February 2018

Listening to high-tempo music can impair learning, but electrical brain stimulation reverses the effects.

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Learning to look faster
6 February 2018

Repetitive training can improve what was thought to be an entirely reflexive behaviour.

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Australian and New Zealand Brain Bee Challenge 2018
1 February 2018

Teacher registrations are open for round 1 of the Australian and New Zealand Brain Bee Challenge, a neuroscience competition for secondary school students. Round 1 is held during Brain Awareness Week (12-16 March 2018).

Register today.
Attention and conscious awareness: similar or opposing?
1 February 2018

Attention and perceptual awareness can have similar or opposing effects, depending on the circumstances.

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Grasping how the brain controls reaching behaviour
30 January 2018

The brain area responsible for visually guided movements – such as reaching, pointing and grasping – is divided into three subregions with distinct yet complementary roles.

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Electrically stimulating the brain while training also enhances performance on untrained tasks
23 January 2018

Electrical stimulation applied to the brain during training can boost performance on new, untrained tasks mediated by the same brain areas.

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Brain champions needed
11 January 2018

The Australian Brain Alliance is looking for Brain Champions to help spread the word and send politicians an important message: that Australians want to crack the brain’s code!

Sign up on their website.
Kiwi kid qualifies for International Brain Bee
9 January 2018

New Zealand High School student Alan Li, 16, is the first in his country to qualify for the International Brain Bee competition and will travel to Berlin next year. It comes after he won the New Zealand national finals section of the Australian Brain Bee Challenge held in Sydney earlier this month.

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New paper from Travis, Dux & Mattingley (UQ)
19 December 2018

Travis, S. L., Dux, P. E., & Mattingley, J. B. (2017). Re-Examining the Influence of Attention and Consciousness on Visual Afterimage Duration. Journal of Experimental Psychology-Human Perception and Performance, 43(12), 1944-1949. doi:10.1037/xhp0000458
Mattingley, Breakspear and Carter help progress Aust Brain Alliance initiatives
14 December 2017

The Brain Function CoE’s Jason Mattingley, Michael Breakspear and Adrian Carter chaired working groups as part of the ‘Brains at the Dome‘ event held by the Australian Brain Alliance (ABA) on 7 December in Canberra. Visit the Australian Academy of Science website to read a copy of the Canberra Declaration.
Brain Function CoE annual meeting awards
7 December 2017

Congratulations to the Centre's Marcello Rosa, Tristan Chaplin, Matthew Tang, James Roberts, Jessica Despard and Lisa Hutton for receiving awards at the Centre's annual meeting.
And the Brain Bee winner is…
7 December 2017

The Australian winner of the Australian Brain Bee Challenge was Elaine Cheung from MacRobertson Girls’ High School in Melbourne and the runner-up was Wenjing Chen from James Ruse Agricultural High School in NSW. The New Zealand champion was Alan Li from Lincoln High School in the South Island and the runner-up was Jemima Po from the Diocesan School for Girls in the North Island.
Neuroethics mini documentary released
7 December 2017

The Centre’s Neuroethics Program Coordinator, Adrian Carter, has featured in a mini documentary produced by Monash University. The video examines the fundamental questions being raised by our growing understanding of the human brain and features experts in philosophy, psychiatry and law.

View the video.
Pitch 2017 winners!
5 December 2017

Congratulations to Molis Yunzab, Ali Almasi and Babak Nasr (pictured L-R) who won the Centre’s inaugural early career research ‘The Pitch’ competition during the Centre's annual dinner. The winning team will now receive $4000 to conduct their pitch project during 2018 and they will present their results at the 2018 annual meeting in Brisbane.
New paper from CI Greg Stuart
5 December 2017

Jones, S.L, To, M-S and Stuart, G.J. (2017) Dendritic small conductance calcium-activated potassium channels activated by action potentials suppress EPSPs and gate spike-timing dependent synaptic plasticity. eLife 6:e30333 doi: 10.7554/eLife.30333
Prestigious scholarship awarded to young investigator
1 December 2017

Cooper Smout, an early career researcher from the Mattingley lab at the University of Queensland, has been awarded a prestigious and competitive 2018 Endeavour Postgraduate Scholarship. Cooper will use the award funding to visit the Predictive Brain Lab, based at the Donders Institute in The Netherlands.
Young investigator wins best talk award
1 December 2017

Nicholas Bland, a PhD student with the Mattingley lab at the University of Queensland, has recently won a ‘Best Talk’ award at the 2017 Australasian Cognitive Neuroscience Society meeting.
Best poster award for young researcher
1 December 2017

Luke Hearne, an early career researcher with the Mattingley lab at the University of Queensland, was recently awarded ‘Best Poster’ at the 2017 Australasian Cognitive Neuroscience Society meeting.
First Gender Equity and Diversity Committee meeting held
28 November 2018

Our new Gender Equity and Diversity Committee had its first meeting on 9 November 2017. The Committee’s purpose is to provide advice and guidance to the Executive Committee with regard to issues pertaining to gender equity and diversity in the Centre. They aim to propose strategies to improve gender equity and diversity within the Centre, in line with our gender equity policy.
FENS Brain Function CoE 2018 Satellite Meeting announced
28 November 2017

The Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Integrative Brain Function and Ruhr-University Bochum are co-hosting a satellite meeting as part of the 11th FENS Forum on Neuroscience in Berlin, Germany.

Read more and to register.
Associate Investigator Alex Fornito widely recognised
21 November 2017

Alex Fornito, an Associate Investigator with the Centre based at Monash University, has had a tremendously successful year with numerous accolades and awards. They include the Australian Academy of Science Gottschalk Medal, a prestigious 2017 Sylvia and Charles Viertel Charitable Foundation Senior Medical Research Fellowship and one of Clarivate Analytics Highly Cited Researchers for 2017.
New paper from Ward and Egan
14 November 2017

Phillip G.D.Ward, Nicholas J.Ferris, ParneshRaniga, David L.Dowe, Amanda C.L.Ng, David G.Barnes, Gary F.Egan (January 2018). Combining images and anatomical knowledge to improve automated vein segmentation in MRI. NeuroImage.
Honeybees could teach drones a thing or two about safe landing
7 November 2017

When honeybees fly around from flower to flower, they control their flight speed so that the images of the world on their retinas move at a fixed speed. But why would they care what speed objects appear to be moving?

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New paper from UQ node
2 November 2017

Verghese, A., Mattingley, J., Palmer, P., Dux, P. (2017). From eyes to hands: Transfer of learning in the Simon task across motor effectors. Atten Percept Psychophys doi: 10.3758/s13414-017-1427-1.
Phil Ward wins VESKI Victoria Fellowship
31 October 2017

Congratulations to Phil Ward who was awarded a Victoria Fellowship at the VESKI Victoria Science prizes last week. Phil, a post-doc based at Monash University, will use his $18,000 award to study new techniques at the Cardiff University Brain Research Imaging Centre to measure how blood vessels respond to changes in brain function, whilst also measuring the amount of oxygen being metabolised.
Paxinos reappointed NHMRC senior research fellow
19 October 2017

Congratulations to one of our Chief Investigators, George Paxinos, who was recently reappointed as a NHMRC senior research fellow (2018-2022). George will continue to work on histological and MRI atlases of brain and spinal cord for research and clinical practice.
Brain research moving in the right direction
12 October 2017

Brain activity ebbs and flows like ocean waves during a tropical storm. The turbulent waves of activity form micro patterns even when we’re sleeping or under anaesthesia, but how these patterns relate to what we’re currently seeing and experiencing is not completely understood.

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Breakspear award and report
12 October 2017

Michael Breakspear from the QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute in Brisbane was recently an RANZCP Senior Researcher Award winner for his abstract: Brain Network Disturbances in Affective Disorders.

Michael has also recently published in Nature’s Scientific Reports: Justin J. Chapman, James A. Roberts, Vinh T. Nguyen and Michael Breakspear, ‘Quantification of free-living activity patterns using accelerometry in adults with mental illness‘.
Transmission wires alert the brain to what the eyes see
12 October 2017

When we see something, our eyes send messages to our brain through the optic nerves. Each nerve contains around a million long ‘wires’, called axons, which carry information from ganglion cells in the retina to relevant parts of the brain. Although at least 20 ganglion cell types have been discovered in primate retinas, how each type contributes to visual processing is not clear.

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The way certain brain cells communicate with each other may underlie how we see things
10 October 2017

It’s clear that our conscious experiences – what we perceive and feel at each moment – have something to do with the brain. But what exactly is the connection? Understanding how conscious experience comes from brains is one of the greatest challenges facing neuroscientists.

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A part of the brain specialised in humans helps manage competing goals
3 October 2017

This study suggests that a part of the brain called ‘frontopolar cortex’ plays a role in assessing the value of an alternative goal and switching to it if it’s more beneficial.

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Examining the brain under threat
28 September 2017

We are more likely to be surprised when we feel anxious. This is reflected in increased brain activity and disrupted connections within the brain. Novel or uncertain situations can make us a little anxious and more alert to potential danger. This state of hypervigilance is helpful in the case of real threats, but when it becomes persistent – such as in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) – it can be incapacitating.

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$20k grant for Teri Furlong, UNSW
28 September 2017

Dr Teri Furlong from UNSW was recently awarded a $20,000 seed grant from Parkinson’s NSW. The grant will enable Teri to extend her Brain Function CoE research.
Stripes and pinwheels, the fashion for vision
19 September 2017

Cells in the visual cortex are organised in a “pinwheel” formation that is altered by visual experience during development — including exposure to stripes. What we see during our early life has a strong effect on the way that our brain’s visual areas are organised.

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